UNSC

ADDRESSING
THE CAUSES OF INSTABILITY
IN LIBYA

 

To portray contemporary Libya as a state in the modern sense of the word would be to obscure much of what has emerged since the toppling of the Gadhafi regime in 2011. Today, three self-styled governments vie for legitimacy in a territory spanning almost 1,8 million square kilometres. From this vastness, a motley of government forces, local militias, religious extremist groups, private contractors, ancient tribes and foreign operators was spawned; each driven by its idiosyncratic material and ideological inclinations, pursuing its individual abstruse calculus. As oil exports stand at a constant risk of disruption, much of the infrastructure, both physical and institutional, started to degrade. Those who have not left the country make ends meet whichever way possible. Illegal trade in gasoline, weapons, narcotics and people has become the cornerstone of the new Libyan economy.

Although few, if any, of these issues have gone entirely unaddressed, approaching different vectors of instability as separate issue-areas greatly diminishes the likelihood of finding a viable long-term solution. If a more sustainable order is to be established, policymakers first need to understand the intricacy of causal connections that fuel instability in Libya. In this sense, the Salient 2017 UN Security Council simulation was envisioned as a learning experience through which participants would come to grasp the totality and causal complexity of contemporary conflicts. 


COUNTRY MATRIX

Bolivia
China*
Egypt*
Ethiopia

France*
Italy*
Japan
Kazakhstan

Libya -GNA (observer)*
Russian Federation*
Senegal
Sweden

Ukraine
United Kingdom*
United States of America*
Uruguay

 

Note: Countries marked with an asterisk (*) require sufficient previous MUN experience.